Tuesday, November 21, 2017

MUSIC BREAK: HORACE HEIDT - HISTORY OF MUSIC

Thursday, November 16, 2017

COOKING WITH THE STARS: MARILYN MONROE

Who knew that the great sex bombshell Marliyn Monroe could cook. With Thanksgiving and the holiday season here, I found a recipe for Monroe's stuffing. It sounds good...


FOR THE STUFFING:
-No garlic
-Sourdough French bread – soak in cold water, wring out, then shred
-For chicken giblets – boil in water 5-10 mins
-Liver – heart then chop
-1 whole or ½ onion, chop & parsley / four stalk celery, chop together following spices – put in rosemary
-Thyme, bay leaf, oregano, poultry seasoning, salt, pepper,
-Grated Parmesan cheese, 1 handful
-1/2lb – 1/4lb ground round – put in frying pan – brown (no oil) then mix raisin 1 ½ cups or more
-1 cup chop nuts (walnuts, chestnuts, peanuts)
-1 or 2 hard boiled eggs – chopped mix together


TO PREP THE BIRD:
-Salt & pepper inside chicken or turkey – outside same and butter
-Sew up clamp birds put chicken or turkey in 350 oven
-Roasting chicken – 3 or 4lbs or larger
-Cooks 30 min to 1lbs
-Brown chicken or pheasant (vinegar, oil, onion, spices) – let cook in own juice
-Add little water as you go
-½ glass vinegar – put in when half done
-Cooks 2 hours

Thursday, November 9, 2017

A TRIP DOWN MEMORY LANE: WEB EPISODE 1

Welcome to my first episode of my You Tube show - titled as you guessed it A Trip Down Memory Lane. From time to time I will do a little 30 minute episode highlighting some of the great stars of our times. For this first episode I will count down my five favorite male singers. I hope you enjoy it, and I encourage comments and suggestions...


Wednesday, November 8, 2017

GUEST REVIEWER: GOOD NEWS

For a long time when I was first watching classic movies, the 1947 film Good News was my favorite musical. It's not my favorite any longer but it's still a pretty good film. Our guest reviewer Bruce Kogan makes his return to our pages reviewing this musical...

Good News was the best musical from the Roaring Twenties from the premier songwriting team of DeSylva, Brown & Henderson. It ran on Broadway for 557 performances in the 1927-29 season and gave the team a number of song hits identified with them like the title song, Just Imagine, Lucky In Love, and The Best Things In Life Are Free. All of those songs made it as well as one of the great dance numbers of the Roaring Twenties, The Varsity Drag.

The musicals of that era had the lightweight nonsensical plots which also was taken from the Broadway show. Big man on campus, Peter Lawford, has to get a passing grade in French to stay eligible for the football squad. He gets mousy student librarian June Allyson assigned as a tutor and the inevitable happens as it does in these films. After that Lawford has to choose between mercenary coed Patricia Marshall and Allyson. It's a struggle, but you guess who he winds up with.


This film is strictly about the music and dance numbers and it offers a rare opportunity to see Joan McCracken singing and dancing which she mostly did on the Broadway stage. She introduces a song especially written for the film Pass That Peace Pipe which was a big hit in 1947 and won for Good News its only Academy Award nomination. Pass That Peace Pipe lost to Zip-A-Dee-Doo-Dah for Best Song. But the number is one of the best dance numbers ever to come from an Arthur Freed produced MGM musical. Joan McCracken died way too young as oddly enough her dancing partner Ray McDonald.

Good News presents an idealized version of the Roaring Twenties and is the quintessential college musical which flooded Hollywood mostly in the years before World War II. It holds up well as entertainment and the songs are still fabulous...


BRUCE'S RATING: 7 OUT OF 10
MY RATING:9 OUT OF 10


Sunday, October 29, 2017

PHOTOS OF THE DAY: FACES OF THE FRANKENSTEIN MONSTER

During this Halloween season, I wanted to take a look at one of my favorite horror story characters and that is Frankenstein's Monster. Since 1931, he has been played on the screen numerous times, but here are some photos of the famous actors playing the unfortunate monster...


BORIS KARLOFF (1887-1969)


GLENN STRANGE (1899-1973)


BELA LUGOSI (1882-1956)


CHRISTOPHER LEE (1922-2015)


PETER BOYLE (1935-2006)


ROBERT DE NIRO (BORN 1943)

Friday, October 27, 2017

HEALTHWATCH: KEELY SMITH


It's sad to me to report, but Keely Smith - a legendary singer of the 1950s and 1960s is in failing health. Her daughter has had to take of her, and unfortunately they have hit hard times. Keely Smith is now 86. Here is the posting from their Go Fund Me page:

Dearest Friends, New & Old -

My name is Toni Prima and I am the eldest daughter of Louis Prima & Keely Smith.

My family & I desperately need your financial help and sincerely appreciate anything you can do for us.

Mother had to retire over five years ago for health reasons and I had to stop working two years ago now due to my own physical problems. I also had a bad car accident a year ago that forced me further into illness. I am now on a walker and unable to stand for very long.

I was having a blast working with the UK's great jive & swing band - The Jive Aces. I was also regularly singing with the marvelous Johnny Holiday Show in downtown Los Angeles.

Once I had to stop working and Mother had been stopped for a few years - as you can imagine all the savings went out the door. We have all gone into terrible debt and been selling things as we could.
It simply is not enough and we need help!!!

At this point we are unable to pay household bills, buy groceries & medicine, and keep our caregivers with us which is of utmost importance.

Please if you are able to help us out it will be such a blessing!!! No amount is too little - every penny is appreciated - and please share this post!!!

God Bless you all and thank you from the bottom of my heart!!!

Toni


I don't have the exact info on what is ailing Keely Smith but I believe it is a heart ailment. If you would like to give to their Go Fund Me page, you can see their info HERE.

I will keep everyone posted on any additional news...


Wednesday, October 25, 2017

RIP: FATS DOMINO

The legendary New Orleans singer and pianist Fats Domino, known for hits like "Blueberry Hill" and "Ain't that a Shame," has died. He was 89.

Domino, whose real name is Antoine Domino Jr., died on Tuesday afternoon of natural causes, Mark Bone of the Jefferson Parish Coroner's Office confirmed to the Daily News.

The iconic artist was born and raised in New Orleans and first broke out into the city's rock and roll scene in the late 1940's after joining the band The Solid Senders.

His first record "The Fat Man" garnered him national attention — selling one million copies by 1953 after it was released in 1949.

It was said to be the first rock and roll record to reach that achievement and some music historians have even credited it to be the first rock and roll record to exist, according to the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.

Domino ultimately sold 65 million records, which is more than any rocker of the '50s except Elvis Presley. His songs landed him on the Billboard pop chart 63 times and the R&B chart 59 times throughout his years.


Domino first found himself sectioned to only the R&B charts until his song "Goin' Home" made it to No. 30 on the main chart and the following year his song "Goin' To The River" landed at No. 24. In 1955, "Ain't It A Shame" helped propel Domino's sound across genres and landing at No. 10 on the pop charts.

A cover of the track, retitled "Ain't That a Shame," was done by Pat Boone and landed even higher on the pop charts at No. 1 for a period of two weeks.

Domino was featured in two films during his heyday, including "Shake, Rattle & Rock!" and "The Girl Can't Help It," both in 1956.


He was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1986 and received a Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award in 1987. Former President Bill Clinton gave Domino the National Medal of Arts in 1998.

The Hall of Fame largely credited him with influencing the likes of Billy Joel, Elton John and Paul McCartney.

Rolling Stone put him on the list of "Greatest Recording Artists of All Time" at No. 25.

Harry Connick Jr. credited the musician with paving the way for New Orleans piano players.

"See you on top of that blueberry hill in the sky," Connick Jr. wrote...